Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Young adults are most likely to switch churches or stop going

Churches need to figure out what is Christ's message to the world and start living up to it and maybe, just maybe, people will return to a time when they wanted to go to church. Too many people standing up in front of the congregations have no clue what Christ taught and it doesn't matter if they are called Father, Reverend, or Pastor. They say one thing, preach from the same Bible but then what Christ said is all but forgotten as soon as they start their sermon.

For many of us, faith is in flux
Young adults are most likely to switch churches -- or stop going, study finds
Jeff Kunerth Sentinel Staff Writer
April 28, 2009

A member of the Holy Family Catholic Church congregation sits by a stained-glass window. ( GARY W. GREEN, ORLANDO SENTINEL / February 25, 2009)


About half of all American adults have changed religious affiliation, most often because they felt spiritually unfulfilled or found a church they liked better, according to a study released Monday.

Young adults are most likely to switch churches or stop going to church altogether. Those who leave the religion of their childhood are most likely to do so before they reach age 24, according to the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life survey.

The religious "churn" suggests that many Americans, even those who don't attend church, are constantly looking for religious fulfillment, said John Green, a researcher on "Faith in Flux: Changes in Religious Affiliation in the U.S."

"There is a real demand side of the religious marketplace that complements the supply side. There are people who are ready, willing and able to change faiths if they find one that appeals to them," Green said.
go here for more
For many of us, faith is in flux