Wednesday, January 20, 2016

PTSD Cured at Fort Hood?

Head exploding time! Just got done reading a post on the Huffington Post claiming to have cured PTSD. Yep, that's right, silly season has begun again and it is just the first month of 2016 following 4 decades of PTSD researchers telling us they all had the answer. The trouble is, folks are still out there claiming they can "cure" PTSD.
"One of the hurdles they face is a lack of belief that PTSD is curable. Many veterans simply don't believe this is possible. Yet there are many studies showing the value of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) approaches such as those used at Reset."
There are also studies on rats showing researchers think they are the same as men and women risking their lives for the sake of others.

When you read the following notice title does not fit the article or even facts.  Just take a look at the news reports from Killeen about suicides and discharges and you'll see for yourself. As for anyone claiming a "cure" for PTSD, that's been claimed for 4 decades but no one has seen proof of it. Love to see a brain scan before and after this to see what exactly had been cured.
Successful PTSD Treatments at Fort Hood
Huffington Post
Dawson Church
Author of "The Genie in Your Genes"
Posted: 01/19/2016

There's plenty of bad news to report on PTSD and veterans, such as a report in Slate magazine about the high rape and murder rates near military bases. Yet these tragedies can obscure the good news, which is that effective PTSD treatments exist, and are finding their way into primary care.

I recently spent a week in Texas, where I had the opportunity to visit Fort Hood, present my research at "Grand Rounds" -- a forum in which health professionals share the latest scientific findings -- and work with a group of veterans with PTSD.

The group was progressing through an 11-week PTSD recovery program called the Warrior Combat Stress Reset Program (usually simply referred to as "Reset"). The impact of PTSD was apparent on their faces and in their stories, as well as their multiple diagnoses: depression, anxiety, and hostility. Several mentioned their desire to deal with their anger, and return to normal lives with their families.
you can read the rest of the article here.