Friday, March 11, 2016

"Wounded Warrior Project must provide real answers"

Can't Get No Satisfaction With Wrong Questions
Wounded Times
Kathie Costos
March 11, 2016

"Wounded Warrior Project must provide real answers" from the Florida Times Union Editorial Board seems to have a lot out on the questions that do in fact need to be answered but doesn't seem as if they know what to ask.

Ok, so Nardizzi and Giordanon are out while the Board of Directors thought it was unnecessary to explain how they let all this happen. It isn't as if it was a one time thing that blindsided them. 

The Board of Directors, just like Congress, have been put into seats to insure things are done right.  Seems to be a lot of avoidance issues on that end and veterans suffered. Oh, did I forget to mention that members of Congress have heard complaints about this group too but managed to have them testify in Washington as if everything was always fine and dandy.

CBS report said WWP was the "largest veterans charity" but they should have said it was the largest money raiser since compared to other charities like the DAV 1.3 million, the VFW with 1.4 million and the American Legion with 2.4 million, they are pretty small.
"According to the board's statement, participation in Wounded Warrior Project programs for injured veterans, their caregivers and family members rose from 1,850 to 144,000 from 2010 to 2015."
The really crazy thing is since news broke from CBS last month, it seems their membership went way up. Wiki still has the numbers up.
As of June 1, 2015, WWP serves 71,866 registered Alumni and 11,494 registered members, defined as family or caregivers of a registered Alumnus.
DAV A Legacy of Service, Hope for the Future

DAV is a nonprofit charity that provides a lifetime of support for veterans of all generations and their families, helping more than 1 million veterans in positive, life-changing ways each year. The organization provides more than 700,000 rides for veterans attending medical appointments and assists veterans with more than 300,000 benefit claims annually. In 2015, DAV helped attain more than $4 billion in new and retroactive benefits to care for themselves and for veterans, their families and survivors.

DAV is also a leader in connecting veterans with meaningful employment, hosting job fairs and providing resources to ensure they have the opportunity to participate in the American Dream their sacrifices have made possible.

With almost 1,300 chapters and nearly 1.3 million members across the country, DAV empowers our nation’s heroes and their families by helping to provide the resources they need and ensuring our nation keep the promises made to them.
So, no they are not the largest in terms of taking care of veterans. Isn't that what we really care about?

Readers of Wounded Times know I am a lifetime member of the DAV Auxiliary and spend a lot of time with the VFW, as well as the simple fact they are all about all generations of veterans and unlike what's been going on in this country lately, they do in fact care about all our veterans. This all goes to show that all the corporations donating millions to WWP should have known what was going on but didn't bother to look. They also didn't bother to think about the other groups treating veterans as equally worthy of their donations.

Ok, so now we also have all the colleges and other charities donors have no clue about since they don't really read press releases.

Wounded Times does and here are just a few of them.

UCLA Operation Mend receives $15.7 million for mental health program for wounded warriors WWP and Warrior Care Network partners will commit a total $100 million over three years to fund the initiative, including $7.5 million each that the medical centers will contribute through their own fundraising efforts.
Rush University Medical Center's veterans program is set to receive $15 million from the Wounded Warrior Project, securing a spot as the Midwest's only hospital to receive such a grant.

OSU named Wounded Warrior Project grant subcontract recipient $250,000.

Dignity Receives $65,000 Grant from Wounded Warrior Project

And there are more but you get the idea.

The really crazy thing is, when news came out a few years ago, it didn't seem to bother any of the folks hot under the collar now.
According to the Beast's report, the Wounded Warrior Project said it was serving more than 56,000 veterans; however, less than two thirds of those registered have interacted at all with the organization so far this year.