Sunday, December 18, 2016

Col. Andrew Poznick, One of Too Many Fort Hood Suicides

Soldier suicides: Stressors, substances and shootings
Killeen Daily Herald
By David A. Bryant | Herald staff writer
December 17, 2106

By all outward appearances, Col. Andrew Poznick was a man with success written all over his future.
Spc. Jared Forsyth | U.S. Army
Lt. Col. Andrew Poznick speaks to his troops with 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, in Basrah, Iraq, on July 29, 2011. Poznick was commander of the battalion. On Sunday, March 20, 2016, Poznick was found dead at his residence near Carlisle Barracks, Pa.
He was a successful combat commander who led 1st Cavalry Division soldiers in Iraq. He had just been promoted to the rank of colonel. And he was preparing to join the faculty of the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa.

On March 20, 2016, he took his own life.

He wasn’t young. He wasn’t new to the Army. He wasn’t under financial duress, and he had left Fort Hood only a few weeks earlier.

But like at least 13 other soldiers on Fort Hood in 2016 — 13 confirmed and four pending confirmation — he chose suicide as a way to end his personal pain.

The soldiers lost to suicide this year on Fort Hood had little in common. About half had deployed to combat before, the other half had not. The youngest was 20 years old; the eldest 45. They were Americans of African, European and Hispanic heritage.

Some were junior enlisted, some were noncommissioned officers and some were officers.

Their names:
Staff Sgt. Devin Lee Schuette
Maj. Troy Donn Wayman
Staff Sgt. Brian Michael Reed
Staff Sgt. Steven Daniel Lewis
Sgt. John Andrew Stobbe
Sgt. Marcus Lamarr Nelson Sr.
Spc. Bernardino Guevara Jr.
Sgt. Duane Cass Shaw III
Spc. Alexander Michael Johnson
Spc. Dion Shannon Servant
Spc. Bradley Michael Acker
Spc. Korey Deonte James
Pvt. Wanya Bruns.
Four other deaths are still under investigation by the Army as possible suicides.
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