Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Veterans Charity Raises Millions to Help Who?

Ok! If you want to know how much BS is floating around as "acceptable" in other words, the guy isn't even ashamed to say this;
“There is no group that I know of that does what we do, educate and advocate for 21 million American Veterans,” he wrote. His small staff accomplishes this, he said, through a “massive bipartisan program” of phone, fax, email and snail-mail contact with more than 500 candidates for Congress; an “earned media machine” that generates attention through news releases; and the publication of the Veterans Vision newsletter once every two years."

Safe bet you learned a hell of a lot more reading this site every day...and I do it alone for free! Plus do you think he can top over 28,000 posts almost everyday for the last ten years on this site alone? Hmm, does over 3.5 million hits count?

Gee do you think he should have actually checked to see what was being done before he made such a stupid statement while defending what he thought he deserved?

(WOW, I need a drink and signing off for now.)


Veterans Charity Raises Millions to Help Those Who’ve Served. But Telemarketers Are Pocketing Most of It.

Politico

By SARAH KLEINER

December 13, 2017
Meanwhile, Hampton’s reported compensation quadrupled — to $340,126 between his two nonprofits in 2015 — in less than a decade.
The warning was prophetic. 

Maurice Levite sat in a modest office in Falls Church, Virginia, about a decade ago, and cautioned his longtime friend, Brian Arthur Hampton, against continuing to use telemarketers to fund his small veterans charity. 

With the help of his fundraisers-for-hire, Hampton had increased Circle of Friends for American Veterans’ income by an astounding amount — tenfold within three years. 

But there was a catch — a costly one. The fundraisers were keeping most of the contributions donors were giving to the charity. Almost all of the money left over paid for overhead costs, such as Hampton’s salary. Veterans themselves received scraps. 
Hampton’s veterans operation is hardly alone. Telemarketer Outreach Calling has contracted with at least a dozen other charities — two of which have been shut down by New York regulators — and keeps an average of 90 percent of the money it raises for them, according to state government records. And other veterans groups, such as the Wounded Warrior Project, have recently endured scandals surrounding their spending.

A lot of charities have to use fundraisers or they close their doors. This is an example of what can go wrong when folks have the best intentions and write checks before looking twice.