Saturday, June 9, 2018

Suicide transfers the pain to family left behind

Families of Suicide Victims Say Pain Gets Transferred to Loved Ones
Erie News Now
by Eva Mastromatteo
Updated: Friday, June 8th 2018

The families of suicide victims are faced with a different way of living, after the loss of a loved one. They may have many questions, along with a host of other issues. Venus Azevedo-Laboda, the founder of a group called Boots on the Ground
The families of suicide victims are faced with a different way of living, after the loss of a loved one. They may have many questions, along with a host of other issues.

Venus Azevedo-Laboda, the founder of a group called Boots on the Ground, in Erie County, knows that well. Her brother, who was in the U.S. Navy, committed suicide, after he returned home from overseas.

The non-profit veterans outreach program was created to support and help veterans dealing with PTSD, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and suicide.

Venus Azevedo-Laboda says, "Unfortunatley what suicide does is just transfer that persons pain onto the whole family, and as families, we say, shoulda, coulda, woulda. I have PTSD from my brothers traumatic suicide so now I have anxiety, I never had anxiety before. Anxiety and depression."
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One more group not being included in the numbers you hear all the time about suicides tied to the military, is when they are still in the military.

The Department of Defense releases a quarterly report showing that an average of about 500 servicemembers commit suicide each year.

Keep in mind that while they were willing to lay down their lives to save someone else, they could not save themselves.